Tag Archives: homeless cat

One of Those Days

My garden at the end of the day.

I must confess that I am a workaholic. I measure days by the amount of work I get done. A bad day usually includes something like never getting out of the house because a small change in cat food has me mopping up after six or seven constantly barfing kitties. A good day is when I can prop up my feet in the dying light of a summer evening, and look back of the multitude of jobs that I completed throughout the day.

Today, I took care of my mother, picked the berries, hoed the garden, and pulled the weeds. I made dinner, did some cleaning, and washed a little laundry. It was a good day. So before the sunlight began to fade, I decided to grab my camera, and take a little time for myself. I took a few photos of my rose tree, and some of lilies, and of course, I had to photograph my almost weed-free garden, before the weeds got revenge. As I turned to take a photo of the sun shining through the trees I saw it… a red fox! A really small red fox was hiding in the grass by the barn. I knew I was too far away to get a photo, but I just had to try, and… Ugggghhhh…. Not again!!!

As you can see, this is definitely not a fox. So much for the good day.

And this is kitten number 2. Below are kittens number 3 and 4. I have seen five so far, and I’m pretty sure they belong to the tortoise shell that someone threw out a while back.  I’m glad I never got into the habit of swearing, or the whole neighborhood would have heard something far more explicit than “OH! NO!!!!” and “JUST BECAUSE I HAVE A BARN DOES NOT  MEAN I WANT  YOUR CAT!!!!”

Irresponsible pet owners are one of my pet peeves. If  you take an animal, you are responsible for that animal, and that doesn’t mean dropping it off by someone else’s house in the middle of the night because you think that person will take it. So she got pregnant, and that’s a problem, but it shouldn’t be my problem.

I understand that getting a pet proper medical care can be expensive, but I also know that with little effort you can find a place that offers low cost, or even free spaying and neutering and basic immunizations.  I got seven of my cats altered, immunized, and treated for fleas at the local Humane Society. I added a very generous donation to my payment, and still only paid a little over a third of what I would have at the vet.  A local spay/neuter organization also offers vouchers to help people who can’t afford to pay the meager amount that the Humane Society charges. Getting your cat fixed doesn’t necessarily have to be a checkbook emptying experience.

With the help of the Humane Society and some other great people, we eliminated the feral cat colony in this neighborhood. Only one, wild tomcat remains at large. All of the others are fixed and now have happy, indoor homes. Thanks to an uncaring pet owner, we have the starting of a new colony. To that person I say, (add lots and lots of sarcasm here.) “THANKS A LOT!!!”

Sue

 

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I Guess I Was Wrong!!

Wishful thinking didn’t stop Skitty from giving birth to four kittens in my laundry basket. I guess that extra weight wasn’t just more fat. The two gray kittens were quite a surprise. No one in the neighborhood has a gray tomcat. Skitty is turning out to be a fantastic house cat. She took to the litter box immediately and is an excellent companion. She has yet to learn dinnertime manners, but that will come in time.

After years of not giving birth, Skitty is a Mommy.

Sue

 

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The New Kids on the Block

When I was a kid, I remember traveling vagrants left marks on the fences of houses that were good for a handout. If you felt a smidgen of sympathy and gave a gaunt, sunken-eyed bum a sandwich, it wouldn’t be long before more vagrants were knocking at the door. The cure to your problem was to paint your fence. I am beginning to suspect that someone has marked my fence, or perhaps I have the word “sucker” tattooed to my forehead in invisible ink? Anyway, if someone dumps a stray cat in our neighborhood, it inevitably ends up at my door. Gent was the last to be taken in of our local feral cat colony. We were free of outside cats for a few months, but….

Meet the new kids on the block.

Skitty

Skitty

Pumpkin

Pumpkin

Princess

Princess

The big one, with the fur coat that would see her through an Alaskan winter, is Skitty. (Named that because she was one skittish kitty) She has grown extremely loving in a very short period of time, and walking to the garden without tripping over her has become quite a chore. The orange one is Pumpkin. You may pull his tail or touch his nose, but petting him is out of the question. The little fluff ball is Princess. She is very delicate, very feminine, and a non-stop chatterbox. We really don’t mind their company, and someone has expressed interest in Skitty and Princess. I’ve already decided to keep Pumpkin as an outdoor cat. (We have plenty of warm shelter for the winter, and finding a home for a cat you can’t touch is difficult.)

But how? How do these cats know that out of all of the houses in the neighborhood this is the one to come to? How do they know which person will run into the house to get them a plate of cat food and a bowl of milk? I think perhaps it’s time to paint my fence, or maybe apply a little makeup?

Sue

 

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The Strange Ways of a Reformed Feral Cat

There was a wild kitty that lived in a shoe --- box.

There was a wild kitty that lived in a shoe — box.

There are horror stories told of foolish humans attempting to domesticate wild cats. Stories of cats that vanish without a trace, shredded drapes, broken treasures, trips to the hospital, and furniture soiled with — well, you get the idea. I remember as a child I watched in awe as my parents worked for what seemed like an hour carefully freeing a feral cat from an old dryer vent, and as I welcomed Abby into my house, I was more than a little worried that her wild ways might interfere with her future home. The truth is, she took to becoming a house cat extremely well. She padded quietly about the house trilling in a singsong, little voice and checking out the downstairs before settling down to rest in front of the fridge. She missed the litter box the first time but soon discovered where it was, and she hasn’t missed since. My curtains are safe, catfights have been avoided, and she hasn’t found a handy dryer vent to wedge herself into. She has, however, ignored the soft quilt, that I gave her to sleep on, in exchange for a box of old work shoes. We have decided it is her way of saying: “When choosing a cat for a wonderful, new home, I’m a shoe in!”

Sue

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The Lucky One

tortoiseshell catIf at one time, Abby had had a human friend, she couldn’t remember who or where they were. She was lost, and partially blind in a very unfriendly world, and now her marginal health was failing. Coughing, sneezing, and gasping for breath became the norm as she rummaged through garbage cans for discarded tidbits and attempted vainly to hunt. Abby’s chances for survival were dwindling. Fate is often a cruel companion, and a sick, homeless cat with compromised vision is destined to become its victim.

It’s not often a cat, much less a sick one, survives being hit by a car, but for the first time good fortune fell upon this gentle natured, feral cat. She not only survived, but someone took pity.

Tortoiseshell cat 3Though Abby’s vision may never fully be restored, she no longer gasps for breath. The large wound on her side has healed and her cracked ribs are swiftly mending, and soon, she will be on her way to a new home where she will always be loved and never again face hunger. Abby is one lucky cat.

If you are thinking of adopting a new pet, why not skip that fancy pet store and the pampered, pedigreed balls of fluff? Consider adopting a homeless cat, like Abby, and give another lucky animal a chance at a better life.

Sue

tortoiseshell cat 2

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